Adilia

I do case management as well as help coordinate monthly meetings for participants. We’ve had meetings and events around issues like immigration, or more fun things like yoga. It can be anything as long as it’s supporting survivors and engaging the community.

I love the clients that I get to work with every day. They’re some of the kindest, most awesome people you’ll ever meet in your life. They’re just real. They could be going through hell and back but they still have a smile on their face and that’s what keeps me coming back. Recently, one of our clients — she has been trying to get her son into this country for some time and it has been a very long process. Just last week I heard from her, and she said her son had his visa. She has been waiting for years, and she finally found out that he’s on his way here.

With other movements, we share the common goal and interest that we want people to feel safe. It all comes down to wanting to end violence in general and to be able to be safe in your community, in a relationship, at home.

Domestic violence is a subject that people don’t want to talk about. It can be triggering for some folks, so we need to learn how to develop more privacy, sensitivity, and understanding.

Sometimes, even for people working in the field, they forget that survivors are people. They might be survivors of DV but there’s so much more that they’re going through. We’re all connected indirectly and directly. We’re all striving for the same idea. DV is not only something that happens in isolation and only affects the person going through it. It affects the whole community, friends, families. We’ve had people call the line who know someone who’s experiencing DV and you can tell the toll it takes on them too. It impacts everyone. It affects children who witness DV, and it trickles down into the whole community.

If we were all a little more educated and knew what DV actually is and looks like, we’d all be more understanding. I went to the ER a couple of years back and some of the questions that they asked made it clear that doctors don’t really understand it. The consultation wasn’t private. DV is a subject that people don’t want to talk about. It can be triggering for some folks, so we need to learn how to develop more privacy, sensitivity, and understanding.

We need to start the conversation and be willing to talk about it more. For myself, coming from a Latino community, it’s hard to discuss DV because of cultural issues that come into play. Just starting the conversation and being more comfortable talking about it would bring us closer to ending DV.

In a world without DV, everybody would be a lot happier; they’d feel safe. Just overall joy. It shouldn’t be something that isn’t achievable.

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